Many people in America have cleaned during the Spring time. People call this “Spring Cleaning.” During Spring Cleaning, people clean their houses, sell old clothes, hold garage sales, and etc.

Some researchers trace the origin of Spring Cleaning to the ancient Jewish practice. For the passover, Jews thoroughly clean their homes in anticipation of the spring-time memorial feast.

In remembrance of the Israelites’ escape from Egypt, Jews could not eat nor drink leavened or fermented yeast. They also had to rid their homes of chametz, therefore, conducting a thorough “spring cleaning” of their house.

In present time, the Catholic Church cleans the church altar and everything associated with it on Maundy Thursday, the day before Good Friday.

In Greece and other Orthodox nations also perform spring cleaning. Spring cleaning is traditionally done either right before or during the first week of Great Lent.

In Providence Academy, teachers also spring clean during their Spring Break– a two week break off of school.

“What I did for Spring Cleaning is get into areas that don’t get done during a regular house cleaning: cleaning out closets, cabinets, freezers, cupboards, the screened porch, etc., and a deeper cleaning of some areas,” Mrs. Ann Brown stated. “This cleaning includes removing items that are no longer used and finding a place or people who can use them- and having the time to deliver them.”

During spring clean many teachers do not clean more, but only “get more areas taken care of” and “spend more time looking through things, organizing, and deciding what to give away and what to keep.”

PA teachers believe spring cleaning is a time of renewal and growth.

As Mr. Daniel Fisher stated, “rains clean away the winter grime and things turn green. It seems a natural time to throw open the windows and let the fresh air in.”

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