Rev. Robert A. Sirico with a PovertyCure DVD. (Photo by: Lauren Perinovic)

Rev. Robert A. Sirico with a PovertyCure DVD. (Photo by: Lauren Perinovic)

With the holiday season upon us, the “giving spirit” is expected to be in full force. But, what if donating money to impoverished communities is not making the positive change we intended for it to make? On October 30, Rev. Robert A. Sirico visited PA and spoke to PA parents about an innovative new project with the mission of “rethinking poverty”.

Rev. Sirico is the president of Acton Institute, “a non-profit research organization dedicated to the study of free-market economics informed by religious faith and moral absolutes,” whose mission is to promote “a free and virtuous society characterized by individual liberty and sustained by religious principles.”

When visiting PA, Rev. Sirico was specifically here to discuss PovertyCure, which is “an independent project sponsored and housed at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty.”

According to Rev. Sirico, the basic idea of PovertyCure is the questions of “is it better to give to people in developing countries, or to trade?”

“Kids see various wrist things to help poor, but we want to help people to understand that these issues are complex and help them to understand them,” concluded Rev. Sirico. PovertyCure is connecting “good intentions with sound economics.”

To find out more about PovertyCure, you can visit their website, http://www.povertycure.org/. 

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